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How to Properly Calculate Dog Years

priceonomics:

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For years, we’ve been inundated with the “fact” that one human year is equal to seven “dog years.” There’s just one problem: It’s a crock of shit.

Read the Blog Post Here »

“The best comedy punches upwards towards the established structure of power, not downwards at oppressed classes”
honqkonq:

there’s a website where you can post a message and it goes out on display for all protesters to see
(fb page)

korrakun:

my favorite college experience is when i had a 7am class and the kid next to me literally poured a monster energy drink into his coffee said “i’m going to die” and drank the whole thing

Last year, when One Direction released “One Way or Another (Teenage Kicks),” a combination Blondie/Undertones cover they recorded for charity, the Guardian’s Adam Boult was prompted to start a list of songs that “must never be covered.” Never mind that 1D’s medley got a seal of approval from Blondie’s Debbie Harry herself; Mr. Boult said it was an “abomination” that somehow “tarnished” the original versions. So it’s not about the gender of the artist doing the cover—it’s about the gender (and age) of their fans. Think about it: Young, poppy acts, have largely young, female fan bases. I believe the reason rockist dudes feel so dang uncomfortable watching these artists cover songs by bands they love is that it points out that they might have something in common with fans of Miley, Lorde, 1D, etc. They might actually have something in common with teenage girls. And what could be worse than that?


Here’s what I want to tell these people: You could do a lot worse than sharing a teenage girl’s taste in music. The pantheon of acts who couldn’t have gotten famous without the support of teenage girls includes a lot of people and bands you probably respect a lot: Michael Jackson. Elvis Presley. The fricking BEATLES. When Nirvana were around, most of their fans weren’t 50-year-old rock critics; they were kids.


Sissy Spacek / Carrie.
“The one thing I know for sure about China, is that I will never know China. It’s too big, too old, too diverse, too deep. There’s simply not enough time. That’s for me the joy of China. Facing a learning curve that impossibly steep. The certain knowledge that even if I dedicated my life to learning about China, I’d die mostly ignorant.”
- Anthony Bourdain, in tonight’s CNN Parts Unknown episode about Shanghai (which imo is probably the best non-fiction TV being produced in the USA these days, his two Emmy’s and consistent quality putting the rest of those CNN bobbleheads to utter shame). Just about all Chinese people understand this overwhelming reality about the mind-boggling vastness of China, but few non-Chinese do, especially the self-proclaimed experts, Sinologists, and lovers of Asian culture. The first step in demonstrating a grasp of China: demonstrating a grasp that China is ungraspable.  (via zuky)